Charity/NfP

Over the course of this project, expect unique and exclusive contributions from outstanding personalities in the charity, international development and not-for-profit sector, including:

    • A Nigerian doctor who took her ambitions to new heights
    • A Ugandan now synonymous with one of the world's leading charities
    • A Zambian who has been recognised by world leaders for her campaigning on social issues

It is our custom to only reveal the identity of the contributors on the day their contribution is published, so to find out who will be #InTheO, follow us on TwitterFacebookG+Instagram, or subscribe to our regular newsletter.

If there is someone who has made amazing achievements in this area that you would like to write for us, please email  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  telling us who they are, and why.

Written by Wednesday, 06 January 2016 Published in Charity/NfP

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A few years ago, I had the opportunity to distil my entire life’s work and life philosophy into one graphic and one phrase. Having spent my career working in large companies, running my own businesses, and dedicating time to philanthropic, social, and community work, I became Master of the Worshipful Company of Information Technologists in 2010. It was through this that I earned the right to apply to the College of Arms for my own official coat of arms. As part of the design process, you get to choose a motto that encapsulates your philosophy.

I gave a speech about entrepreneurship in Cape Town earlier in 2015 where I said that there has never been a better time to build a successful business. However, I’ve always believed that whilst creating wealth through enterprise is good, it’s what you do with the wealth that you create that really matters. My argument is simple: there is nothing wrong with doing well for yourself and making money, but this needs to be balanced by doing good and using that wealth to help others. Therefore, my wife and I chose as our motto for the coat of arms: ‘Do well. Do good’.

Written by Friday, 31 October 2014 Published in Onliris blog

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If you’ve been plugged in to discussions pertaining to Africa in recent years, you’ve probably heard rhetoric aplenty along the lines of 'Africa is rising', 'Africa is the future', 'This is the new Africa' and other statements of a comparably rosy hue. Similarly, if you’re a lover of all things tech, you’ve probably heard – if you’re not one of the many tweeting it – that this is the digital era, technology is the now and the future (and other statements of a comparably rosy hue). Now pause for a second, if you will, and imagine the barrels of crude optimism pumping through the veins of someone who identifies as both a young African and a technophile. Given all this combined hype, such a person would be half forgiven for donning their dictator’s robes and embarking on a mission to conquer the planet (Google Maps app to hand - how else would we make it 100m down the road?), firm in the belief that the world really is theirs for the taking.

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